Episode 24: Proof that authenticity is the golden nugget with Josephine Lancuba

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Proof that when you share your truth, your original story & are authentic it’s like a weight being lifted off your shoulders. In today’s episode, I chat with award winning entrepreneur, author and speaker, Josephine Lancuba about the growth stages of building a multiple 6 figure business, doing all the things with ease and being awesome in the process.

Links

Josephine Lancuba Instagram
Josephine Lancuba Facebook
Josephine Lancuba Website
Hayley Osborne Instagram
Hayley Osborne Facebook

Josephine Lancuba’s Bio

Welcome back to another episode of The Hayley Osborne show. I am so happy that you’re here. Today’s episode is an absolutely awesome interview with the amazing Josephine Lancuba. Now, if you don’t know who she is, I’m going to read out her very impressive bio before she actually tells you herself very shortly. So a little bit about Josephine from a young age, she had to make her own way in the world. She went from begging for food stamps yes I’m going to pause, to successfully running her purpose filled six figure creative businesses.

After a well-run career as an artist that saw her perform on a multitude of stages and on TV screens for over a decade. It wasn’t until she was four months pregnant with her first child that she decided to hang up her microphone. She has not been back since and she has not looked back since. Now Josephine is an award-winning entrepreneur, a performing artists business strategist and coach, a speaker and TV presenter, a talent agent, a theatrical producer and writer, and elected member of the oz dance and youth New South Wales standing committee. Josephine has grown multiple six figure businesses, production focused youth programmes and events, talent agencies, online and service based creative businesses. Music was Josephine’s sanctuary as a young person, and so is her mission to spread the joy of the arts creating happy and fulfilled humans. She believes in social, emotional, and physical benefits of the Performing Arts. She’s also an advocate for creating inclusive and positive opportunities for talent, industry professionals, and art businesses alike. Her flagship course, talent manager bootcamp is where she coaches performing art studio owners in developing their in-house talent management service. Josephine has a wealth of knowledge.

Today’s chat was so inspiring and motivational for me. There are parts and pieces of this where, it just proves that when you are consistent, and when you are more so persistent with what it is that you want to achieve as a business owner. The results are endless, and there is no glass ceiling. So without further ado, let’s get into it.

Welcome to the podcast, Josephine Lancuba. I am so excited to have you join me. Thank you so much for taking the time to be here.

Transcription

Josephine Lancuba:

Yay, I’m excited to be here! Thank you so much.

Hayley Osborne:

So, I have just read out your stellar bio. I would love you in your own words to tell my awesome listeners who you are and what you do.

Josephine Lancuba:

Okay, well look my journey started as an artist. So, I come from a performing arts background, but essentially, I moved into after my performance career, I hand up my microphone. I have to add, I was probably about four months pregnant on stage and I just went, Ah, I’m tired.

So, I hung up my microphone, and I went into the world of business. I started off with developing programmes and workshops for schools. So I was going into high schools and facilitating their recreational periods. So, we would have contracts with schools and providing those services. I soon realised that I couldn’t do all the things and if I wanted to expand and grow, I needed other people and I needed to do a little bit more. I ended up moving into owning my own studio. Initially it was just one space. Now I have the Musical Makers Club which is eight club sites and then I went on to becoming a talent manager. So, managing and representing artists in film, television, commercial theatre, so on.

And I suppose my love for that and the talent management side and really nurturing those emerging artists. That was my biggest passion really developing young people and really nurturing the arts. So I thought okay, how can I teach people what I know. So, then I went on to coaching and so now, I still have my beautiful studio programme. I have my agency, but I’m also a coach for other creative businesses, and studio owners, as well alike. So that’s what I do.

Hayley Osborne:

You do a lot, and you’re a mumma.

Josephine Lancuba:

Yes, I have two little ones a five and seven year old. I love to have my, finger in different pies, but I am hyper focused. So, even though there sounds like there’s a lot going on, i’m on the standing committee with Oz Dance, New South Wales, I’m a speaker, I do a lot of different things, a podcaster. But it’s all channelled into this same, creative business industry scope, I think if I had a cafe, and I was, doing this I think that would be a little bit different. I guess I’ve managed to keep the ball rolling, I suppose. Because it’s everything I’m passionate about, and that I love.

Hayley Osborne:

Yeah, well, I guess it’s also a matter of evolution, right? You started somewhere, and then you feel that it grows this way, you nurture that, and then you move into that, and everything just builds into a beautiful flow, which I love. Doing all of that, but then you have these two children on the side that are completely different to running businesses and all the rest of it. I love speaking to women who have their own businesses, multiple six figure businesses, you have a definite footprint in your industry. And you are a mum, and you are doing all the things. I’ve listened to some of your podcast episodes, and you haven’t sugar coated anything.

Josephine Lancuba:

I’m not a sugar coater. I used to be I think I used to shy away from, being my authentic self, because I was afraid that people would judge me and I suppose that’s just natural human behaviour, right? We’re afraid that people are going to judge us. But now I’m just like, you know what, I don’t really care. I think sharing my true story, my past the challenges and everything in between. I’m really proud of that, because it took me a lot to share my story, but once I did, it was like a weight had been lifted off my shoulders. And now you can’t shut me up.

Hayley Osborne:

That’s a good thing though right, I think we grow into that. So, I read that in your early days this beautiful success story for anyone that’s listening at the moment that feels like they’re just kind of treading water. But in the early days, you’ve got some big accolades, you do some big things, move, and shake the industry that you went from begging for food stamps. Let’s just pause. To successfully running your several multiple six figure businesses. And you’ve worked with some of the most amazing companies such as channel 7, channel 10, Big W, Optus, McDonald’s, the list goes on. I have actually got goosebumps now reading that out because it’s that’s huge.

Josephine Lancuba:

I definitely come from the school of hard knocks, I grew up in a violent home, you know, domestic abuse and all sorts of things. So, I was out of home at a really young age. It’s actually funny, because when you experience trauma, there’s a lot of cloudy moments in your memory. I know that I was out of home by 15. I might have been out of home by 14. And this is what I mean by cloudy memory.

But anyway, so I was out of home by the age of 14 to 15. And it was tough. I always had this passion for singing. I knew it then. But it was really hard to sort of foster that sort of activity without parental support because as we know, to go and do dance classes or singing lessons, and you know, it’s almost well it’s not almost it’s a privilege, right? So, I wasn’t really able to do that, at a certain point, especially when I was out of home, and I had no support.

So, I guess I made my own way through life I eventually was working doing admin, I dropped out of school when I was in Year 12, because I was scared to do the HSC exam at the time. And that’s again, just not having any parental support to say, you’re gonna be okay, just go for it, you know. So, then I thought I dropped out school went into an admin role. And I remember this is back in the day when you have iPhones and whatnot. Like tablets, things I was flicking through the Yellow Pages, and I thought, this was at work at my desk, and I thought when I was18, I was like, I really just want to dance.

I was looking at dance classes in the yellow pages. And I came across this studio, and they were advertising for a full-time course. So full time musical theatre, theatrical course, I thought, Wow, that’s amazing. So, I had to audition. And I prepared myself. As soon as I get to this audition, I do it. And I got in. I literally had a ballet skirt, that was not the right size. It was secondhand, and I couldn’t sew. So, I was pinning it with safety pins, like I was, it didn’t matter. So you know, the story goes on, I suppose that beginning is what led to that strength, you know, so I had to really rise from the trenches, I suppose, and say, right, what do I want in my life? And I just went for it, you know. That’s how it all started.

Hayley Osborne:

That’s a very inspirational story. And one, I think business owners obviously listen to this podcast, they are already in business, but the struggles are still there, but they come in different shapes. So, everyone has their own kind of trauma I guess, so to speak. But it’s just finding your inner strength somehow taking inspiration from conversations like this and going you know what? Fuck it. It’s time for me to go all in. Because I can’t keep doing this.

Josephine Lancuba:

Yeah, totally. And I think everyone as well has different level of challenges. Even in business, someone will have let’s say they’re $100,000 in debt, and they’re at their wit’s end, and they just can’t make it through versus someone who, has something minor. Let’s say they’re in $1000 debt, but they might feel the same way. So that you can’t really quantify how that feels in an individual. I think stress is stress trauma is trauma challenges is challenge. So, I never judge even though sometimes you can’t help it when someone says, oh, this is tough. I’m like that’s nothing you’ll be right.

And then I got to remind myself that everyone goes through their own thing, you know, I suppose what led to me, also being passionate about facilitating the dreams of others, and nurturing others to rise and do well within their own space, whether it be artistically or in business or creatively. That’s really a passion of mine.

Hayley Osborne:

So, you started off, obviously dancing in the performing arts, you went into that, in terms of making that transition over to business owner, obviously, they’re very different. So, did you have a mentor? Did you buy a course? How did you go from point A to point B? And how did you get a feel for it?

Josephine Lancuba:

Yeah, so my very first business course actually, believe it or not, was provided to me and this is again, because I come from that low socio-economic background was, I think I was in my, maybe early 20s. And I went and did a course that Centrelink had provided, and it was the best and it probably isn’t the best right?

But it was for me because it opened my eyes to the possibilities. I did a certificate in foreign business administration or something like that. That was my very first course and I was like, wow, okay, I can do this like a name my little business plan are so excited. I chose my logo and my colours and it was all happening. Since then, a lot of what I do is absolutely investment in mentor. So now I have like I invest in mentorships and programmes. I’ve been doing it for years. Some may say I am obsessed with learning. I love to learn.

Hayley Osborne:

You love to learn, but you also love to teach. That’s part of what you do.

Josephine Lancuba:

And because I am a teacher, like I’m a teacher, by nature, I’ve been teaching basically all of my adult career in one way, shape or another. Leading managing teams, leading and that sort of thing that’s just natural. And I and that’s why I think that whole teaching aspect is something that I just do till this day, but absolutely, I think it doesn’t matter where you are, doesn’t matter how far you are. I mean, I’m in these beautiful women’s networking and business groups. And you’ve got women that are like, skyrocketing, you’re talking seven, eight figure businesses a year and they’re going through mentorship. I don’t think there’s any phase where you are above learning from others.

Hayley Osborne:

Yeah, that’s good advice. So, another piece of great advice, I would love you to tell our listeners. So, being in the performing arts and creative industry, you would have mastered the art of showing up confidently, what is your number one piece of advice to others listening to be able to do this?

Josephine Lancuba:

You know, it’s interesting, because even when I started becoming a talent agent, I had severe impostor syndrome. And it wasn’t until I was sitting on the couch. And you know, we all work from home these days. This was a couple of years ago, I was sitting in my pyjamas sitting on the couch. And I was submitting someone for a role with Hugh Jackman. And I remember at that moment, thinking, Whoa, look at me, little old me, who’s nobody, right? Is sitting here submitting someone for a role to be aside Hugh Jackman.

And that’s when it clicked. I went, huh. This is just a job. There is no glass ceiling. We’re all just people. And we’re all just doing our thing. And I think when you realise that there is no elite, and there is no them in us. That’s when you thrive because you’re like, hey, I got this. These people just started like me; they’re nobodies just like me. And I say that in a lighthearted way. Of course, we’re all somebody and you know, I’m not trying to, put my own self down or anyone else. But the point is, we all started as these little people with no experience that learned and grew and evolved because they were interested in what persistent and consistent you know. So, I think the key is to just go for it. And remember that it’s not you against them. There is no them. We’re all the same we’re all just people doing our thing.

Hayley Osborne:

That’s really good advice, to take the advice on board, listen and absorb it. Like that’s the part I feel like, oh, yeah, it’s all well and good for you. And it’s all well and good for me. And we’re doing this thing right now. But it is a real thing. And I think to be able to really see that is to be in the same room as other successful people and realise that they’re in jeans and sneakers, and they’re doing their thing. And they’re running seven figure businesses, and they’re just normal. And if they can do it, anyone can do it. And that’s kind of, you know that what works for me.

Josephine Lancuba:

If you get in a room with a bunch of successful entrepreneurs, it’s interesting because it’s totally flavorful. You know, you’ve got the person in their tracksuit, literally versus someone in, you know, their beautiful schmuck suit. And at the end of the day, that’s the beauty, especially of online business. It’s for everybody, That’s why I went into the space. It’s so accessible, so inclusive, that anybody can be in the online world. And so, it was so attractive not to be in that space and not just rely on service industry business, which I have done for many years. I think COVID was a real wake up call to how can we do things differently.

Hayley Osborne:

Yeah and I think the impact that you can have in this space as well, reaching a lot more people across a lot more shores, and I think that’s the reason why, a lot of us move into the online space, especially with podcasting. Like me interviewing you, there are so many people that are going to hear this and they’re not necessarily in the same state or country. But you get to have a voice and reach the whole world, which that’s just exciting.

I talk a lot about on my podcast and in my business by not marketing yourself and your business, you’re wasting opportunities. So, what are the biggest opportunities that you’ve received by being super consistent along the way goal going all in? And putting yourself out there?

Josephine Lancuba:

Biggest opportunities? I suppose it’s interesting, because, I prescheduled my socials for the weekend. I think one of the things I’ve got prescheduled is, oh, it took 10 years to become an overnight success, you know, something like that. And it’s just funny because it’s that persistence. And that consistency piece that you mentioned, consistency is everything. I say persistence is my superpower. The opportunities that have come from just being persistent and showing up is unbelievable.

I mean, even being elected to be on the standing committee for Oz Dance New South Wales, the only reason that happened was because I applied for it. That’s part of persistence. I mean, backing yourself, right. Just, you know, at the moment, I’ve been selected to be on the panel with, Tina tower, and some other women at a retreat in Uluru with a group of beautiful businesswomen. And the only reason I’m on that panel is because I did my podcast, I did an application, I followed up and was persistent, so I suppose the key to it all is all these opportunities will arise when you are persistent.

Now I’m starting to get approached for speaking gigs in my creative business space. This is something and I’m all about, like vision boards and stuff. I mean, for me, I don’t know if that’s woo woo or not, I don’t think so. Speaking is one of those things that I put up there. I’ve been doing it for quite a few years, but a lot of it was self-managed events. So now to not actually have to go out and seek it. And to actually be invited without seeking it, I suppose. That’s a great opportunity for me, because I love getting on stage, I love even whether it be a virtual stage or a real life stage. I love telling my story and you know, sharing what I know, and in the hopes that it will inspire and impact others. So just being approached I think opposed to always being the seeker is a nice change of pace this year.

Hayley Osborne:

Yeah, that’s lovely. But you worked hard to get there. So that’s the byproduct, right? It comes. But you’ve got to put in the work. No one’s gonna come knocking on your door, you’re not gonna get tapped on the shoulder. You have to make your own way.

Josephine Lancuba:

No, even the podcast itself. I mean, I love my podcast, business arts and all that jazz. It’s funny, though, because it took me 18 months of procrastination to get that up and running. And it was on my vision board. And then I took it down and put the picture up because I have pictures. I took it down, I put it in the drawer, then I pinned it back up. And then I went off, for goodness sakes, don’t just do it. And the barrier. And sometimes you need to recognise what is the friction point?

What is this barrier that’s stopping me from doing what I want to do? And the barrier I realised was the technology? Learning the software, and learning how to upload and put it in. That sounds ridiculous now because it’s really easy. But at the time, just the thought of learning that new software was my friction point. And so what I did was I thought, right, if this is my friction point, hire a friken consultant, Joe. I hired one based virtually they did a couple of sessions with me, they helped me set it all up in person, like in live time, and they did it all with me. And, and that was it. And it was done, that was the best couple of 100 bucks. You know because that was it. That’s all I needed to do to get over the hurdle. I suppose the point is, you know, all these friction points that we have, if you can actually decipher what it is, then that will actually help you to move forward.

Hayley Osborne:

Same goes with me launching this podcast if I didn’t have a business coach at the time. I think that I would have probably procrastinated a lot more and it is definitely yeah, whatever that friction point is, it is the tech it is anything that you have to think with your physical brain that you don’t have to do on autopilot. So everything autopilot is easy. But progress is made when you have to think with your whole brain, the part that hurts the most.

Josephine Lancuba:

Even just setting up my Kajabi platform for anyone listening Kajabi, you know, software website tool, great for coaching. And I use Kajabi. Anyway, that wasn’t too bad. It’s easy once you’re in there. But again, I bought the programme and I sat on it for probably about two to three months. And that’s because again, I was afraid of the learning the new software. This is one of my things. I’m savvy with technology, but I don’t like new things. Like when it comes to technology, I tend to get comfortable and not want to move programmes or software companies. Like everyone, I guess!

So that whole thing with Kajabi. And I was like, oh, God, so I hired a consultant again. I’ve set up the pages, but I don’t know how to make this thing go live. And then they did. And I was like, ah, done. And now it’s all self-managed. Sometimes it’s just that one little thing, you know, and again, I think the guy cost me like 150 bucks. And I was like, yeah, best $150 I ever spent, because I would have sat here for another three months. Thinking about it.

Hayley Osborne:

Yeah. And then that $150 is like, you would make that back in a heartbeat over a week even. And also, your time invested. Because time is everything right? So, it is worth investing to, I guess make progress. And I guess, skyrocket the learning curve very quickly so that you don’t have to worry about it.

Josephine Lancuba:

Totally, especially when you are juggling so much. So, you know, when you are a mum or you’ve got multiple businesses or other commitment, family commitments, or whatever you’ve got going on. It’s just if you can remove something off your plate, and just know that that’s something you don’t have to do everything from zero to 100. You know, I think that’s been a learning curve, too, for me of letting go of doing all the things and being able to outsource. I love outsourcing. Not to your detriment, financially, obviously you need to be responsible with what is feasible for you. But at the end of the day, it just frees up especially as a creative, it frees up that creative zone. And it allows me to think when I don’t have to have those things on my back that are that are weighing me down with worry or, or uncertainty. I know I can hand that off to someone else. Or I can be educated by someone else. And that’s going to help me move forward and create that space to think and do better work in the long run.

Hayley Osborne:

Yeah, I think that’s really good advice. Thank you for sharing that. So, is there one thing or one person that has been most influential in your business?

Josephine Lancuba:

It’s really interesting. One person or one thing, I suppose it’s interesting, because I would say that it’s a web of things, people. But I did actually, and this was a very surprising thing that happened a couple of years ago. There’s a beautiful woman that approached me to be my mentor. I didn’t approach her. I don’t pay her for mentorship. By the way, this was really a bizarre scenario. And I heard that it was possible, but I never thought it would happen to me. And she actually runs a performing arts business as well. She noticed me, she wanted to help me like get to the next level. And she has become quite a good friend of mine. And I don’t abuse her generosity. I don’t call her every day. I don’t even call her every month, but every now and then if I’ve needed someone to lean on, she’s been there.

I would definitely urge people to seek mentorship for that reason. I mean, even during COVID I remember there was one day I was in lockdown. And it was just my locale that was in lockdown. And I felt like everything was going to hell and back. We had productions booked events venues worth 10s of 1000s of dollars ticket sales, all the things and I didn’t know if it was gonna go on. And it was next week this performance and this event. It’s a huge investment, any live event whether it be a conference, a show, anything a live event is an investment.

There’s a lot of money at play as well and a lot of people, right? I just didn’t know what’s gonna go ahead and I called her I was like, oh, I feel so down. And she was just there to listen and give really sound advice, which is, you can’t control everything, Joe, there are things that are going to be out of your control. And that’s okay. And, you know, just come up with a plan B. So I came up with a plan B, which wasn’t ideal, but I knew I had it. I think that’s the key. Whenever there’s that crazy moment where you think everything’s gonna fall apart.

I always think about what’s the worst thing that can happen? Okay. Is there something that I can do to make it not so bad? Here’s my plan B isn’t the most ideal plan. No, but if plan A fails, we’re going to go fold straightaway to Plan B. I know it’s there. And it’s waiting for me. And that’s my little security blanket. But definitely this lovely woman, her name’s Simone. And she’s been wonderful, really wonderful, actually. And I think it’s important to have those people in your life. I’d love to say it’s my family, but it’s not. My husband, he’s very supportive, but he’s not overly interested in everything I do when it comes to business. And you can’t blame him. It’s not his zone of genius. It’s not his field. And sometimes it can be a bit deflating when you’ve just come off this big high. And you’re like, Oh that was like the best thing I ever. And they’re like okay cool.

But now I do all sorts of things. Like, I’m turning around, because I’m looking at my goals. There’s that bell that I ring when I get new clients. And now when my kids hear the bell, they know, you’ve got a new client. I go yep! And I ring my bell. And I do it with my team to say every Friday, I check in with my team. This is for my performing arts business. I check in with my team, and I let them know how many more members we have. And I congratulate depending on the coach on which club site I go, Congratulations, Coach Jordan, you’ve just got two new members at your club site. I ring the bell Whoo. And I colour in the board and I did it on my Whatsapp group on video. And they’re all supporting each other cheering each other on going on good work Jordan good work team and involves the team.

It shows them wow, we’re getting results. That’s because of me. Congrats. I just got congratulated, I’m doing a good job. So just keeping the energy up. So, I try and seek energy from wherever I can get it. I’m an extrovert and heart. And I and so I do get energy from others. Like I said, sometimes your family, it could be your mum, it could be your cousin or but every time you tell him something like, I think that’s really what should you be doing that? Should you be running a business now in COVID? Do you think putting on an event is a good idea?

Hayley Osborne:

Or do you think that, you know, you’ve got a one-year-old and you’re six months pregnant and you’re running a business that you want to take to seven figures? Do you really think that’s a good idea, right now?

Josephine Lancuba:

Do you get people asking you?

Hayley Osborne:

Yeah, and it’s usually like, friend. So, no one that’s in my family circle like in my immediate family circle, but people that don’t quite understand.

Josephine Lancuba:

Yeah, totally. I think there’s an energy in pregnancy. When you are pregnant, you get shit done.

Hayley Osborne:

It’s so true. I’m about to go to an elite intensive day actually where, this is like seven figure business planning. And I’m going to be seven months pregnant, and I could not be more excited.

Josephine Lancuba:

I actually started my very first studio business. And actually, well, I dabbled in business prior to being pregnant. But when I was pregnant, I said, I have to make this work. And I’m gonna commit to this full time. I want this to work. So, I actually started my business when I was pregnant. And when I had my first child is when I invested in a commercial lease property.

Hayley Osborne:

And how old was this first child?

Josephine Lancuba:

Less than six months.

Hayley Osborne:

Yikes, that’s great.

Josephine Lancuba:

No, but I was like on a mission. I was like I am not doing this grind anymore. I am not working, in jobs that I hate. Not even the performance aspect. So being an actor and a singer, I was performing in gigs every single weekend. As much as I loved performing, I did feel that I had my run, and I’m good with it. I didn’t want to do it anymore. Because especially as a performer these gigs I mean, you could be out in walk for up until one o’clock in the morning and driving back like it just wasn’t a life that was going to suit my new normal, which was being a mom and I wanted to do that. Some people don’t care. They love performance, and they want to keep going until forever and ever and I totally get that. But for me, it just wasn’t in me. I’d had enough. So yeah, I think that whole pregnancy energy is a real thing. It’s like a whole new perspective on life.

Hayley Osborne:

Yeah, the bloods pumping heavy with all those endorphins. So successful businesswoman, Josephine, where do you see this business? In five years time?

Josephine Lancuba:

At the moment, I’ve got my flagship course, which is called Talent Manager Bootcamp. So, I provide one on one coaching for all creative business types. But I also have my flagship course, which essentially makes the studio owner into a talent manager. And so, they can actually create their own in house talent management, service agency. So, I am very much invested in this emotionally all sorts of things. I’m really down with what I’m doing right now, I want to help make the arts accessible to everybody. Now, I originally started doing and to all young people, I want it to be inclusive. I don’t want there to be an elitist attitude towards the arts.

And I don’t want it to be for only certain types of people. I want everyone to be involved. That’s why I started the musical Makers Club because I wanted a programme that was truly inclusive, that wasn’t audition based, because musical theatre in Australia is only by audition. So I created a programme that was not audition base that anyone could be a part of.

So that was the first step. But then I realised how can I expand that? So that’s why I said, right, I’m going to do this agency that’s inclusive. Everybody can join everybody. Everybody who is confident can be on a television commercial. Anyone can a toddler can, whoever can be represented as a commercial artist, when I saw a youth agency advertising and they had a picture of a kid. I thought is this for real, crawling across the floor saying has your child got what it takes and takes?

l said, I’ve got to do something about this. So that’s when I started my own agency, I’d worked for other agencies as a talent rep. I thought no, this is gross. This can’t be the industry i’m in no. So I created an agency that was fully inclusive, commercial work anyone can do, like I said, but when it comes to more skilled stuff, like obviously, if you’re going from musical theatre, you’re gonna be able to sing and dance, right? But again, that inclusivity, right. And then I thought, how can we even broaden that, like you talked about the online space, having that further reach and impact.

And then I realised I need more people doing what I’m doing. So I’m going to teach him how I do it. And that was the whole idea of talent manager bootcamp because I wanted to teach the studio owner, how they could to make the professional industry accessible to them, that there was no glass ceiling, that everyone can do it if they have a desire to do so. And I truly believe that and I reckon that in a couple of years, I would love to have studio owners across the country, providing their students with professional work opportunities against smashing the glass ceiling on the industry.

I’m also looking to launch the course in the in the USA, and I’m aligning at the moment with a US consultant who’s a talent agent as well. And we’re in discussions at the moment. So that’s my goal to launch the course in the States as well. My goal is I just want everyone to be able to do everything that I didn’t have the opportunity to do growing up. I didn’t have the resources but didn’t have anyone around me knew anything about it. If I had had a studio owner who was in touch with the industry, I would have had access a lot earlier, and probably would have had a more thriving performance career. But it just wasn’t a thing. And it’s still not a thing. So, if I can create that, and just bring the industry to everybody, like I said all the nobodies.

Hayley Osborne:

Sky’s the limit, baby.

Josephine Lancuba:

So you know, global domination, yada, yada five years.

Hayley Osborne:

Let’s do it! We’re gonna have this conversation again, in a couple of years time, you’re going to be on my podcast, and we’re going to touch base on how’s it all going and reflect on this conversation today.

Josephine Lancuba:

I would like to think that it was an international course by that stage. The problem is, it’s not so much a problem, I suppose, is when you have industry specific courses that are very much aligned to a country of origin, like mine, because there are rules and standards that differ in different countries. For example, in America, you’ve got pilot season and all these different you need to be able to understand the scope of the country in the space that you’re moving into.

So I didn’t want to just jump in and say this is an international course, I will have different editions. So I’ll have like my Australian edition, what’s Australian New Zealand edition of the course. I’m creating my US edition, I may have a UK edition, that kind of thing. So I know it makes it a little bit more complex. But I want to provide quality and true industry insight that’s relevant to you know, different states and territories.

Hayley Osborne:

Yeah. How exciting. Oh, my God. All right. So next thing? Yeah. If people want to connect with you, what’s coming up for you? Oh, I didn’t even touch on this. You have a book as well. So you are you’ve got all the things.

Josephine Lancuba:

So just to touch on the book very quickly, the women changing the world was a book that was collectively written by a group of entrepreneurial women who had a view basically that everyone has the power to change the world. And each of us wrote a chapter in the book. Which was really fun. I mean, I’m a writer, as in, like, I write scripts, and shows and plays and music, but I’ve I hadn’t written anything, that was in relation to an actual book. So this was my chapter on my story. And yeah, it’s been amazing. This was set up through. I don’t know if you’ve ever heard of the Ausmumpreneur network. So I won the Creative Arts Award in 2020, the Ausmumpreneur Creative Arts Business Award. And then, in 2021, I was selected to be a judge for us Ausmumpreneur. They’ve invited me back again. And then I had this opportunity brought to me to be invited into this collective book. I was like, Oh, my gosh, I gotta do it, so I did it. It’s called the women changing the world. It’s available on my website as well www.josephinelancuba.com/books but it’s also available anywhere online that you love to buy books, but it was your best selling book on Amazon.

Hayley Osborne:

Wow. Awesome. What’s coming up for you at the moment? How can people connect with you online to learn more about what you do? Tell us your social handles and all the things.

Josephine Lancuba:

Okay, so basically, I’m creative business coaching one on one I absolutely do that doesn’t matter if you know if you’re a baker, a candlestick maker, a dancer doesn’t matter. I think if you have a creative business and that’s something that can absolutely help you thrive. The other thing is I believe I’ve got a pencil in my hand I’m doing I love this I love anything to grab but I’m in well, I think it’s going to be launch week by the time this drops.

But anyway, talent manager boot camp is the course so for anyone out there that’s a performing art studio owner or teacher that’s looking to you know, maximise their student’s potential and increase their revenue, their industry credibility and their student retention talent manager boot camp is the way and again you can check that out www.josephinelancuba.com/tmb.

And I’m all over socials Josephine Lancuba, Facebook, Instagram, follow me. I do put up some silly reels, I burn bras, that was a bit of fun. My most recent one I’m I’m on the floor crawling like a worm and then I’m flying in the air saying your bird or your worm, you’re better your worm you’ll see me shake my pom pom’s in launch week every time I get a new client. I’m shaking my rainbow pom poms. Yeah, having a good time. So you can find me on Instagram for sure.

Hayley Osborne:

Awesome. Josephine. This has been a cracker of a chat. I have loved every minute. Thank you so much for taking the time to chat with me. And yeah, I loved it. Thank you.

Josephine Lancuba:

Oh, you’re welcome. Thank you so much for having me.


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